How To Communicate As An Intern

Communication remains one of the most critical skills for a professional, regardless of the industry. Indeed states that internships are vital for developing professional skills, one of which is communication within a corporate environment. However, for new interns, it can be a very awkward road to walk. When is casual discussion permitted? How relaxed is too casual? Interns across the world struggle with these questions, and many times, no one is there to answer them. Here are a few useful tips about how to be a better communicator throughout your internship.

Ask Questions

Many people have a fear of appearing stupid, and because of this innate terror, they fail to ask questions about things they don’t know about. However, as an intern, you don’t have the luxury of being self-conscious. The University of Washington Bothell notes that asking questions shows that you’re enthusiastic about learning. Most professional firms prefer interns that want to learn about what they do than those who pretend that they know everything already.

Take Notes

Lifehack reports that writing things down can make them much easier to remember later. Depending on how organized you are, you can delineate your writing into categories, or simply jot them down as they come at you. Ideally, you would have a different page for each task or type of job you’re expected to do and record their steps there. With time, you won’t even have to refer to the book, but having a written guide will remind you throughout your internship.

Don’t Abuse Meeting Privilege

If you’re meeting with more senior workers, try to keep it short and sweet. Enterprises such as Tradition Company suggest that their interns send emails if the meeting isn’t strictly necessary. This practice helps keep the interns on their toes. It allows them to think critically about what responsibilities they can handle themselves and what they need a more senior person to approve.

An Internship is an Adventure

Being an intern in a company is a chance to explore the business and its practices. You might learn a lot from your first workplace, but only if you dedicate the effort towards understanding what they’re doing. Interns are in the perfect position to observe and discover. Eventually, you’ll be able to do those things without even thinking twice about them. However, at the start, be diligent and keep asking questions, even if you believe they are irrelevant.

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