Supporting Our Immigrants – How We Can Help New Americans

Regardless of the continent, country, or city that you live in, it’s highly likely that you either know someone or have interacted with someone who immigrated there in search of something more. People travel and move all over the world daily and oftentimes find either temporary or extended residency in various parts of the world that they have come to cherish. They often adjust quickly to the new culture and mesh seemingly well with those around them. They develop the lifestyle of the natives around them, and begin to contribute to the community in their own special way. However, there are challenges connected to immigration and uprooting as well. 

Not everyone is always welcoming or friendly. Stereotypes form and prejudices are born. People will look down on visitors because they’re not the same as them or their neighbors. It’s possible that persecutions will arise and judgments will turn into actions. Not everyone is prejudiced nor judgmental, but some have had bad experiences in the past that have led them to be defensive about their way of life and the culture surrounding them. They’re not looking for change, and would rather expel any threats to their way of life that they’re quite fond of.

However, as we often find in life, for every action, there is an opposite. Many community members reach out and go out of their way to support their new friends and make sure they’re taken care of. They help them feel at home and comfortable in their new surroundings. They include them in activities and ensure that they know their way around their new surroundings. Companies will jump in and provide relief. They’ll fill in the gaps where a friendly helping hand simply won’t do. 

One of the largest struggles for immigrants is picking up the new language. This isn’t a skill that will simply come with immersion. It requires effort and dedication to learn a new language. But there are legal documents that are required even before residency can be claimed. Because of this, translation agencies have begun to appear. Providing relief for those that cannot yet speak the native language. 

One translation agency in London has done an exceptional job in caring for non-native speakers, refugee’s included. They offer services in document translation. Which is extremely beneficial for those looking for permanent residency in a new land. Government agencies insist that these documents be filed out to perfection. This translation agency has taken it upon themselves to provide over 100 different languages all supported by native speakers in order to ensure quality work. Because they help refugees as well as immigrants they ensure fair prices and work with deadlines, in order to meet those obliged by the government.

If we were to take upon ourselves the responsibility to help those in search of support, as KL Translations does, research shows that our immigrants would then be able to expand in their new places of residency and bolster the community in stronger and healthier ways.

Adam Hansen