5 Types of Phishing Every Employee Should Look Out For

When it comes to cybersecurity, employees need to be on the lookout for all sorts of phishing attacks. It is important for employees to be aware of the different types of phishing that exist in order to avoid falling prey to them. 

Here are 5 common types of phishing scams:

1. Deceptive Phishing

Deceptive phishing is the most common type of phishing scam. In this type of scam, attackers send emails that appear to be from a trusted source, such as a company or organization.

The email may contain a fake logo or other branding elements to make it look more legitimate.

2. Spear Phishing

Spear phishing is a type of phishing scam that is targeted at a specific individual or group of people. The attacker will send a personalized email to the target, often using information that they have gathered about them from public sources.

3. Whaling

Whaling is a type of phishing scam that is targeted at high-profile individuals, such as CEOs or other executives. The attacker will send a personalized email to the target, often using information that they have gathered about them from public sources.

4. Vishing

Vishing is a type of phishing scam that uses voice calls instead of email messages. The attacker will call the target and pretend to be from a trusted organization, such as a bank or government agency.

They may ask the target for personal information, such as their Social Security number or credit card number.

5. Smishing

Smishing is a type of phishing scam that uses text messages instead of email messages. The attacker will send a text message to the target, often using a fake caller ID. The text message may contain a link that will install malware on the recipient’s phone or device.

Tips for Employees

These are just a few of the many types of phishing scams that exist. It is important for employees to be aware of these scams and to know how to protect themselves.

Employees should never click on links or attachments from unknown sources. They should also be cautious of giving out personal information, such as their Social Security number or credit card number, to anyone who they do not know and trust.

Organizations should also provide training on how to identify and avoid phishing attacks. By taking these steps, employees can help protect their organizations from costly data breaches.

Chris Turn